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WE BELIEVE IN THINKING BIG

The Rensselaer Technology Licensing Office focuses on promoting Rensselaer’s innovations to both benefit the public and stimulate economic growth. We are your dedicated resource for streamlining collaboration with industry. Click below to find information on securing intellectual property protection and how our office works with researchers to help protect and promote their discoveries and inventions.

Targeting Prostate Tumors with Better Precision

As clinicians work tirelessly to improve cancer treatment on a more personalized level, they are partnering closely with engineers who are enabling vastly improved medical imaging. “In order to do precision medicine, you need to see better,” said Pingkun Yan, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer. “If you cannot see, you can’t do anything.”

ONE SPARK IGNITES A DOZEN MORE

Our mission at Rensselaer’s Technology Licensing Office is to share great ideas with you. We encourage you to browse our database of available technologies. These inventions may help shape the future of your business.

Marcian “Ted” Hoff Class of 1958

In 1969, Hoff invented the first electronic circuit that combined complicated computer functions on a single silicon chip, earning him recognition as the “father of the microprocessor.” This single chip had as much computing power as the first electronic computer, ENIAC, which in 1946 filled a room. The microprocessor created a revolution in computing.

Latest News

  • A new agreement will formalize a long-standing relationship between two pivotal players in the Capital Region gaming industry: the Games and Simulation Arts and Sciences (GSAS) program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Vicarious Visions, the prominent game development company behind popular titles like Guitar Hero, Tony Hawk, and Crash Bandicoot.

    As part of the partnership, Vicarious Visions will sponsor GameFest, the student game development showcase and competition GSAS hosts each year. The memorandum of understanding also established the Vicarious Visions Pathfinder Award, an annual merit-based scholarship that will be presented to one Rensselaer student in recognition of demonstrated excellence in game development.

  • In order to earn certification in general surgery, residents in the United States need to demonstrate proficiency in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic program (FLS), a test that requires manipulation of laparoscopic tools within a physical training unit. Central to that assessment is a quantitative score, known as the FLS score, which is manually calculated using a formula that is time-consuming and labor-intensive.

    By combining brain optical imaging, and a deep learning framework they call “Brain-NET,” a multidisciplinary team of engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in close collaboration with the Department of Surgery at the Jacobs School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo, has developed a new methodology that has the potential to transform training and the certification process for surgeons.

  • A new course available in the upcoming semester at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will meet the current moment by equipping students on campus and off with novel strategies for pursuing and practicing music performance in an era of social distancing and remote learning.

    With the COVID-19 pandemic necessitating certain public health guidelines, and the Rensselaer return-to-campus plan calling for some students to remain off campus in the fall, proceeding with the traditional music ensemble courses in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) was not a feasible option.

  • TROY, N.Y. — If builders could incorporate solar harvesting into the siding of a building, the amount of energy from the grid that a structure would need may significantly decrease.

    In research published recently in Renewable Energy, a team of researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, led by Diana-Andra Borca-Tasciuc, a professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering, demonstrated the potential of wedge-shaped luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). These efficient modular solar units could easily be hung on the side of a building.

  • TROY, N.Y. — The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about an increase in telework and online commerce, and a significant decrease in the number of personal trips people are making. Understanding the effects of these rapid changes on the economy, supply chains, and the environment will be essential, as some of these behaviors will continue even after the pandemic has ended.

    Researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute recently presented the results of two sets of surveys they conducted in an effort to quantify and understand these unprecedented shifts. One survey was collected from respondents in more than 20 countries, and the other was collected within the United States.

  • As the volume of available information expands, the fraction a person is able to absorb shrinks. To break this cycle, computer scientists say we need new algorithms that prioritize a broader view over fulfilling consumer biases.

  • TROY, N.Y. — With COVID-19 still spreading in the United States, where it has already killed more than 140,000 people, improved screening and treatment options are critically important for high-risk patients with comorbidities, such as diabetes, pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular disease.

    A new grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will support the rapid development and integration of a series of artificial intelligence algorithms that will analyze multiple pieces of health data — from chest computed tomography (CT) images to vital signs — in order to help clinicians assess disease severity and predict patient outcomes. The effort is being led by Pingkun Yan, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

  • TROY, N.Y. —When the Shewanella oneidensis bacterium “breathes” in certain metal and sulfur compounds anaerobically, the way an aerobic organism would process oxygen, it produces materials that could be used to enhance electronics, electrochemical energy storage, and drug-delivery devices.

    The ability of this bacterium to produce molybdenum disulfide — a material that is able to transfer electrons easily, like graphene — is the focus of research published in Biointerphases by a team of engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

    “This has some serious potential if we can understand this process and control aspects of how the bacteria are making these and other materials,” said Shayla Sawyer, an associate professor of electrical, computer, and systems engineering at Rensselaer.

  • In a test of antiviral effectiveness against the virus that causes COVID-19, an extract from edible seaweeds substantially outperformed remdesivir, the current standard antiviral used to combat the disease.

  • TROY, N.Y. — With hurricane season already underway and projected to be active, communities throughout the U.S. are trying to balance disaster preparation amid an unprecedented public health crisis. While significant attention is rightly being given to COVID-19, leaders – especially those in communities along the coast – must plan for the possibility of dual disasters.

    Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have extensive experience studying and responding to natural disasters and are available during this hurricane season to share their research and perspectives: