1824 today
196
Years of Innovation
5
Signature Thrusts
746
Labs, Studios & Technology Spaces
32
Research Centers

WE BELIEVE IN THINKING BIG

The Rensselaer Technology Licensing Office focuses on promoting Rensselaer’s innovations to both benefit the public and stimulate economic growth. We are your dedicated resource for streamlining collaboration with industry. Click below to find information on securing intellectual property protection and how our office works with researchers to help protect and promote their discoveries and inventions.

Targeting Prostate Tumors with Better Precision

As clinicians work tirelessly to improve cancer treatment on a more personalized level, they are partnering closely with engineers who are enabling vastly improved medical imaging. “In order to do precision medicine, you need to see better,” said Pingkun Yan, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer. “If you cannot see, you can’t do anything.”

ONE SPARK IGNITES A DOZEN MORE

Our mission at Rensselaer’s Technology Licensing Office is to share great ideas with you. We encourage you to browse our database of available technologies. These inventions may help shape the future of your business.

Marcian “Ted” Hoff Class of 1958

In 1969, Hoff invented the first electronic circuit that combined complicated computer functions on a single silicon chip, earning him recognition as the “father of the microprocessor.” This single chip had as much computing power as the first electronic computer, ENIAC, which in 1946 filled a room. The microprocessor created a revolution in computing.

Latest News

  • Using a nanopore, researchers have demonstrated the potential to reduce the time required for sequencing a glycosaminoglycan — a class of long chain-linked sugar molecules as important to our biology as DNA — from years to minutes.

  • The Rensselaer Plan 2024, the strategic plan that guides Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, dedicated the university to innovative teaching and research “that addresses the most compelling global challenges.” In the last year, no challenge has consumed the globe more than the COVID-19 pandemic — and the Rensselaer community has stayed true to its mission.

  • Envisioning an animal-free drug supply, scientists have — for the first time — reprogrammed a common bacterium to make a designer polysaccharide molecule used in pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals. 

  • The era of widespread remote learning brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic requires online testing methods that effectively prevent cheating, especially in the form of collusion among students. With concerns about cheating on the rise across the country, a solution that also maintains student privacy is particularly valuable.

    In research published today in npj Science of Learning, engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute demonstrate how a testing strategy they call “distanced online testing” can effectively reduce students’ ability to receive help from one another in order to score higher on a test taken at individual homes during social distancing.

  • When a pandemic and a natural disaster hit a community simultaneously, disease exposure and social distancing can limit the availability of critical personnel, leaving a community positioned for a lengthy recovery. With both types of events expected to occur with increasing frequency, a team of researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has been running simulations to better understand how communities can weather concurrent crises.

  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will receive a Grants for Arts Projects award this year to support the commissioning of new time-based art works at the Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC).

    Grants for Arts Projects is the principal grants program of the National Endowment for the Arts, awarding a total of nearly $25 million to support 1,073 projects in the arts across America in this first round of fiscal year 2021. This award marks the fifth consecutive year that EMPAC has received funding from the Arts Endowment.

    “EMPAC is among the arts organizations across the country that have demonstrated creativity, excellence, and resilience during this very challenging year,” Arts Endowment Acting Chairman Ann Eilers said.

  • Mars experts and researchers from the Rensselaer Astrobiology and Research Education (RARE) Center will host a virtual watch party of the NASA Mars 2020 Perseverance rover landing.

  • An antioxidant found in green tea may increase levels of p53, a natural anti-cancer protein, known as the “guardian of the genome” for its ability to repair DNA damage or destroy cancerous cells.

  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will host its 21st Black Families Technology Awareness Day on Saturday, February 20. For the first time, the event will be held entirely virtually and will be open to K-12 students around the globe.

    The free program is designed to expose talented young people, as well as their families and educators, to educational and career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics — often referred to as STEM fields. This year’s theme is “STEM: Solving Life's Problems."

  • TROY, N.Y. — Jonathan Dordick, the Howard P. Isermann ’42 Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), for his “contributions to methods for rapidly screening drug efficacy and toxicity, and biocatalytic technologies for improving human health.”

    Election to the NAE is among the highest professional honors bestowed upon an engineer. According to the Academy, membership recognizes those who have made outstanding contributions to “engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature” and to “the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering.”