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WE BELIEVE IN THINKING BIG

The Rensselaer Technology Licensing Office focuses on promoting Rensselaer’s innovations to both benefit the public and stimulate economic growth. We are your dedicated resource for streamlining collaboration with industry. Click below to find information on securing intellectual property protection and how our office works with researchers to help protect and promote their discoveries and inventions.

Targeting Prostate Tumors with Better Precision

As clinicians work tirelessly to improve cancer treatment on a more personalized level, they are partnering closely with engineers who are enabling vastly improved medical imaging. “In order to do precision medicine, you need to see better,” said Pingkun Yan, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer. “If you cannot see, you can’t do anything.”

ONE SPARK IGNITES A DOZEN MORE

Our mission at Rensselaer’s Technology Licensing Office is to share great ideas with you. We encourage you to browse our database of available technologies. These inventions may help shape the future of your business.

Marcian “Ted” Hoff Class of 1958

In 1969, Hoff invented the first electronic circuit that combined complicated computer functions on a single silicon chip, earning him recognition as the “father of the microprocessor.” This single chip had as much computing power as the first electronic computer, ENIAC, which in 1946 filled a room. The microprocessor created a revolution in computing.

Latest News

  • TROY, N.Y. — The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly altered how people shop, how much they buy, the trips they take outside their homes, and the number of tele-activities — like work, medicine, and education — that have become commonplace. These changes were rapid and have tremendously impacted the economy, supply chains, and the environment.

    Two sets of surveys were conducted by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in an effort to quantify and understand these unprecedented shifts — and evaluate the likelihood they may last after the pandemic has ended. One survey was collected from respondents in more than 20 countries, and the other was collected within the U.S.  

  • TROY, N.Y. —The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that landfills received 26.8 million tons of plastic in 2017, underscoring the need for a recycling process that is more efficient, effective, and affordable.

    With the support of a grant from the National Science Foundation, chemical engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute aim to develop a new polymer that can replace polystyrene, a commonly used plastic that is inexpensive and easy to make — but is difficult to break down into its original components for reuse, a process called depolymerization.

  • TROY, N.Y. — Chemically engineered peptides, designed and developed by a team of researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, could prove valuable in the battle against some of the most persistent human health challenges.

    The team’s findings, recently published in Nature Scientific Reports, demonstrate how researchers can engineer peptides capable of selectively and specifically binding to polysialic acid (PSA) — a unique carbohydrate that is present on critical human cells and plays a key role in various physiological and pathological processes, including neurological development and disease progression.

  • TROY, N.Y. — A surgeon makes an incision on a virtual patient with support from a perioperative nurse, while an anesthesiologist monitors the patient’s vital signs. As the procedure continues, the team members navigate together through any challenges that arise — even though each of them may be participating from different rooms, buildings, or even cities.

    A new $2.3 million grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of Health will support a research effort led by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute to make that virtual scenario — and others like it — a reality.

  • What is the value of a really good bottle of Bordeaux? Not one that can be bought at the neighborhood wine store for $20, nor even a $100 bottle that might be purchased at a fancy restaurant. How much should collectors and wine distributors pay for those rarified fine wines that, when mature, might sell for thousands of dollars?

    These are the questions that M. Hakan Hekimoğlu answers in research published today in Production and Operations Management. Hekimoğlu, an assistant professor in the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and his co-author, Burak Kazaz of Syracuse University, have developed a robust and highly accurate pricing model for Bordeaux wine futures using four factors: temperature, precipitation, market index, and expert reviews.

  • As part of the inaugural class participating in The Arch at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, rising senior Lucretia Shumate ’21, a dual biochemistry/biophysics and bioinformatics/molecular biology major, secured a fall semester away research internship at Magee Women’s Research Institute in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    Solving real-world problems and impacting women’s lives every day, Magee-Women’s Research Institute and Foundation focuses their research efforts on reproductive development, pregnancy and newborn medicine, infectious disease, gynecology, reproductive endocrinology and infertility, women’s cancers, and women’s wellness. Established in 1992, they are the largest research institute in the United States with a multitude of partnerships across the U.S. and around the globe.

  • TROY, N.Y. — Short of cameras, there are few tools at the disposal of health care providers or loved ones to remotely monitor patient safety within hospitals and assisted living care facilities. A new system of infrared sensors is able to provide real-time data about a person’s movements in a room while also maintaining their privacy.

    Developed at the Center for Lighting Enabled Systems & Applications (LESA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the system was originally designed to make energy management in buildings more efficient. However, researchers realized that it also provides an effective and affordable solution for a major challenge in health care.

  • The Center for Career and Professional Development (CCPD) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute continues to strategically build partnerships with companies to create an array of opportunities for students to pursue as part of The Arch at Rensselaer.

    During The Arch, all students must spend a fall or spring semester of their junior year participating in an off-campus Individual Learning Experience (ILE), which could take the form of an internship or co-op, international or national opportunity (i.e., study abroad or study at another U.S. institution), or research, civic engagement, or a self-designed experience.

  • The manner in which the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare racist and systemic inequalities in the United States has parallels in other environmental health threats, such as lead exposure, according to an essay written for the online magazine Toxic News by two researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

    In the essay, Abby Kinchy, a professor, and Dan Walls, a postdoctoral research associate, both in the Department of Science and Technology Studies at Rensselaer, specifically compare the American government response to lead-contaminated environments with its reaction to the novel coronavirus crisis.

  • TROY, N.Y. — A team of researchers led by Sufei Shi, an assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has uncovered new information about the mass of individual components that make up a promising quasiparticle, known as an exciton, that could play a critical role in future applications for quantum computing, improved memory storage, and more efficient energy conversion.

    Published today in Nature Communications, the team’s work brings researchers one step closer to advancing the development of semiconductor devices by deepening their understanding of an atomically thin class of materials known as transitional metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), which have been eyed for their electronic and optical properties. Researchers still have a lot to learn about the exciton before TMDCs can successfully be used in technological devices.