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WE BELIEVE IN THINKING BIG

The Rensselaer Technology Licensing Office focuses on promoting Rensselaer’s innovations to both benefit the public and stimulate economic growth. We are your dedicated resource for streamlining collaboration with industry. Click below to find information on securing intellectual property protection and how our office works with researchers to help protect and promote their discoveries and inventions.

Targeting Prostate Tumors with Better Precision

As clinicians work tirelessly to improve cancer treatment on a more personalized level, they are partnering closely with engineers who are enabling vastly improved medical imaging. “In order to do precision medicine, you need to see better,” said Pingkun Yan, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer. “If you cannot see, you can’t do anything.”

ONE SPARK IGNITES A DOZEN MORE

Our mission at Rensselaer’s Technology Licensing Office is to share great ideas with you. We encourage you to browse our database of available technologies. These inventions may help shape the future of your business.

Marcian “Ted” Hoff Class of 1958

In 1969, Hoff invented the first electronic circuit that combined complicated computer functions on a single silicon chip, earning him recognition as the “father of the microprocessor.” This single chip had as much computing power as the first electronic computer, ENIAC, which in 1946 filled a room. The microprocessor created a revolution in computing.

Latest News

  • A computer’s ability to convincingly respond to questions like a person — thereby “passing” what has come to be known as the Turing Test — is widely regarded as a practical measure of artificial intelligence. But Bram van Heuveln, a lecturer in the Department of Cognitive Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, contends that this common interpretation misses the important point that British mathematician Alan Turing was trying to make in his 1950 paper, “Computing Machinery and Intelligence.”

    Van Heuveln makes the case for a new understanding of the Turing Test in a chapter of the book Great Philosophical Objections to Artificial Intelligence: The History and Legacy of the AI Wars, published this month by Bloomsbury.

  • As cancer and tumor cells move inside the human body, they impart and are subject to mechanical forces. In order to understand how these actions affect cancer cell growth, spread, and invasion, a team of engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is developing new models that mimic aspects of the mechanical environment within the body, providing new insight into how and why tumors develop in certain ways.

    In research published today in Integrative Biology, a team of engineers from Rensselaer developed an in vitro — in the lab — lymphatic vessel model to study the growth of tumor emboli, collections of tumor cells within vessels that are often associated with increased metastasis and tumor recurrence.

  • Blood sample analysis showed that, two to five years after they gave birth, mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) had several significantly different metabolite levels compared to mothers of typically developing children. That’s according to new research recently published in BMC Pediatrics by a multidisciplinary team from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Arizona State University, and the Mayo Clinic.

  • An analysis of an exhaustive dataset on cells essential to the mammalian immune system shows that our ability to fight disease may rely more heavily on daily circadian cycles than previously assumed.

    Malfunctions in circadian rhythms, the process that keeps our bodies in tune with the day/night cycles, are increasingly associated with diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s, and many other diseases. An investigation published today in Genome Research shows that the activity of macrophages — cells within us that seek and destroy intruders like bacteria — may time daily changes in their responses to pathogens and stress through the circadian control of metabolism.

    In this study, Jennifer Hurley, the Richard Baruch M.D. Career Development Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and senior author on this study, and her team investigated how the levels of RNA and proteins in macrophages change over two days.

  • As communities across the United States struggle to manage a wave of COVID-19 infections, a multidisciplinary team of researchers argue that the pandemic has revealed the ways in which engineered structures and services have contributed to society’s challenges. They subsequently insist that the built environment — including both engineered structures and services — cannot be ignored when developing long-term pandemic mitigation.

    In an article recently published in The Journal of Critical Infrastructure Policy, a team led by David Mendonca, a professor of industrial and systems engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, implores engineers and social scientists to re-examine the models, data collection methods, and assumptions that their research is currently built upon.

  • In a money-saving revelation for organizations inclined to invest in specialized information technology to support the process of idea generation, new research suggests that even non-specialized, everyday organizational IT can encourage employees’ creativity.

  • TROY, N.Y. — A loss of enzymatic processes within the body can increase a person’s risk of bone fracture. This new insight was recently published in eLife by an international team of scientists and engineers led by Deepak Vashishth, the director of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

    Enzymatic processes are essential to any number of chemical reactions that occur within the body, including the production of the extracellular matrix within bone that is critical for mechanical support. Phosphorylation — one of those key enzymatic processes — is the attachment of a phosphoryl to a protein, and is critical for cellular regulation. This process plays a role in many diseases, but until now, researchers didn’t know if it altered tissue integrity and organ function.

  • The 2020 wildfires on the West Coast stymied planned research at the University of California Blue Oak Ranch Reserve, but also created a rare chance to catch the first link in the chain that connects fire-derived “black carbon” from a charred hillside with the deep ocean.

  • The stress that COVID-19 has placed on medical facilities across the country highlights the need for safe, convenient, and functional surge capacity that can be used for hospital care or quarantine during a public health crisis.

    A new research effort led by a team at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute aims to improve manufacturing of rapidly deployed structures in order to address future shortages of medical care and quarantine facilities, as well as housing needs following a disaster. This project will rely on the development of a group of self-aware, human-directed robots to assist in manufacturing, and is being funded by the Department of Defense through the Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing (ARM) Institute.

  • Especially during the holidays, online shopping can be overwhelming. Have you ever found yourself spending hours comparing nearly identical products, delving into details that don’t actually matter to you? Have you ever finally reached a decision only to find that the product you want is out of stock? Unfortunately, if so, there is a good chance you did not end up making the best choice.

    According to new research from behavioral economist Ian Chadd, an assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, irrelevant information or unavailable options often cause people to make bad choices. When both elements are present, the probability of a poor decision is even greater.