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WE BELIEVE IN THINKING BIG

The Rensselaer Technology Licensing Office focuses on promoting Rensselaer’s innovations to both benefit the public and stimulate economic growth. We are your dedicated resource for streamlining collaboration with industry. Click below to find information on securing intellectual property protection and how our office works with researchers to help protect and promote their discoveries and inventions.

Targeting Prostate Tumors with Better Precision

As clinicians work tirelessly to improve cancer treatment on a more personalized level, they are partnering closely with engineers who are enabling vastly improved medical imaging. “In order to do precision medicine, you need to see better,” said Pingkun Yan, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer. “If you cannot see, you can’t do anything.”

ONE SPARK IGNITES A DOZEN MORE

Our mission at Rensselaer’s Technology Licensing Office is to share great ideas with you. We encourage you to browse our database of available technologies. These inventions may help shape the future of your business.

Marcian “Ted” Hoff Class of 1958

In 1969, Hoff invented the first electronic circuit that combined complicated computer functions on a single silicon chip, earning him recognition as the “father of the microprocessor.” This single chip had as much computing power as the first electronic computer, ENIAC, which in 1946 filled a room. The microprocessor created a revolution in computing.

Latest News

  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning are revolutionizing the ways in which we live, work, and spend our free time, from the smart devices in our homes to the tasks our phones can carry out. This transformation is being made possible by a surge in data and computing power that can help machine learning algorithms not only perform device-specific tasks, but also help them gain intelligence or knowledge over time.

    In the not-so-distant future, artificial intelligence and machine learning tasks will be carried out among connected devices through wireless networks, dramatically enhancing the capabilities of future smartphones, tablets, and sensors, and achieving what’s known as distributed intelligence. As technology stands right now, however, machine learning algorithms are not efficient enough to be run over wireless networks and wireless networks are not yet ready to transmit this type of intelligence.

  • The Jefferson Project at Lake George — a groundbreaking collaboration between IBM Research, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and The FUND for Lake George — is expanding its statewide leadership role in the study of harmful algal blooms and other water-quality threats this summer with a new $1 million research project on Chautauqua Lake in Chautauqua County, made possible through funding from Chautauqua Institution and a county coalition. 

  • TROY, N.Y. — Optoelectronic materials that are capable of converting the energy of light into electricity, and electricity into light, have promising applications as light-emitting, energy-harvesting, and sensing technologies. However, devices made of these materials are often plagued by inefficiency, losing significant useful energy as heat. To break the current limits of efficiency, new principles of light-electricity conversion are needed.

  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug for treating schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder that includes samidorphan, a new chemical entity discovered at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

  • The future of quantum computing may depend on the further development and understanding of semiconductor materials known as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). These atomically thin materials develop unique and useful electrical, mechanical, and optical properties when they are manipulated by pressure, light, or temperature.

    In research published today in Nature Communications, engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute demonstrated how, when the TMDC materials they make are stacked in a particular geometry, the interaction that occurs between particles gives researchers more control over the devices’ properties. Specifically, the interaction between electrons becomes so strong that they form a new structure known as a correlated insulating state. This is an important step, researchers said, toward developing quantum emitters needed for future quantum simulation and computing.

  • More strategic and coordinated travel restrictions likely could have reduced the spread of COVID-19 in the early stages of the pandemic. That’s according to new research published in Communications Physics. This finding stems from new modeling conducted by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

    The researchers evaluated the distance between countries in terms of air travel, a more complex measurement than simply mapping physical distance. For instance, while China and Thailand may be geographically more proximate to one another, if there are significantly more flights between China and the United States, the chance of disease spread may be higher. 

  • Most everyone has heard about the dangers of lead — a toxic metal used for centuries that, because of mining, industrial pollution and automobile emissions, is found in the soil of playgrounds, parks, empty lots, and maybe even your backyard. Remediation or removal is expensive and nearly impossible in many situations. So how can people try to reduce the harms caused by lead in the soil of their communities?

    Abby Kinchy, a professor in the Department of Science and Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will seek to answer these questions with the support of a Scholars Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The $94,000 grant will enable Kinchy to trace soil lead residues in four countries with distinctive roles in the lead industry: the United States, Chile, the United Kingdom, and Australia.

  • Oxygen levels in the world’s temperate freshwater lakes are declining rapidly — faster than in the oceans — a trend driven largely by climate change that threatens freshwater biodiversity and drinking water quality.

  • The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated inequities in urban freight and the delivery of goods. This misalignment in the supply chain is perpetuating food insecurity, especially in areas where grocery store access is limited or non-existent and for those who have limited access to e-commerce.

    With the support of a $325,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will develop mathematical models that allow them to study how this urban freight gap could be closed. Among other issues, they will consider the potential effects of traffic network and route reconfiguration, the sustainability of offering free or low shipping fees, and the supply chain costs associated with healthy food items. They will also explore what policies could support equitable market change.

  • As more dissolved organic matter enters lakes across the northeast United States, darkening the lakes in a phenomena called “browning,” new research shows that these waters may be growing less productive and able to sustain less life.