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WE BELIEVE IN THINKING BIG

The Rensselaer Technology Licensing Office focuses on promoting Rensselaer’s innovations to both benefit the public and stimulate economic growth. We are your dedicated resource for streamlining collaboration with industry. Click below to find information on securing intellectual property protection and how our office works with researchers to help protect and promote their discoveries and inventions.

Targeting Prostate Tumors with Better Precision

As clinicians work tirelessly to improve cancer treatment on a more personalized level, they are partnering closely with engineers who are enabling vastly improved medical imaging. “In order to do precision medicine, you need to see better,” said Pingkun Yan, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer. “If you cannot see, you can’t do anything.”

ONE SPARK IGNITES A DOZEN MORE

Our mission at Rensselaer’s Technology Licensing Office is to share great ideas with you. We encourage you to browse our database of available technologies. These inventions may help shape the future of your business.

Marcian “Ted” Hoff Class of 1958

In 1969, Hoff invented the first electronic circuit that combined complicated computer functions on a single silicon chip, earning him recognition as the “father of the microprocessor.” This single chip had as much computing power as the first electronic computer, ENIAC, which in 1946 filled a room. The microprocessor created a revolution in computing.

Latest News

  • Shifting customer shopping habits, exacerbated by the recent pandemic, have forced retailers to reimagine the way goods and services are handled. “Omni-channel services” — such as buy online and pickup in store, in-store returns, ship from store, and home delivery — have shifted the in-store logistics once done by shoppers to retailers. To share inventory and material handling equipment among online and in-store customers, researchers led by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) are proposing to design suburban omni-channel facilities and modular and robotic platforms that support their operation.

    “Omni-Channel Facilities Supported by Modular and Moveable Robotic Platforms” is supported by a $497,610 grant from the Raymond Corporation.

  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute announced the establishment of the Future of Computing Institute, formerly known as the Institute for Data, Artificial Intelligence, and Computing (DAIC).

  • Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) have published research in Molecular Pharmaceuticals predicting how proteins interact in drug development. The research, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), is in collaboration with Amgen and University of Michigan – Ann Arbor. In the paper, researchers use a mathematical model to predict the viscosity of solutions of proteins to be used as drugs. This is critical in drug development as the viscosity determines the method of delivery — needle or IV.

  • Students in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s School of Architecture are helping to restore ecology along the shoreline of Randall’s Island in New York City through a unique studio project to create ecological installations designed to cultivate habitat conditions for native species while providing erosion protection.

    Much of today’s urban coastline exists as hard sea walls or “riprap” – large, piled stones or other durable material – used to armor the coast against erosion and wave action. “Intertidal Objects: A Design Solution for Coastal Erosion” aims to promote a living shoreline in which the coasts exist in softer forms with vegetation and other life that mitigate against storm surges.

    Over the summer term, students — led by Professor Marcus Carter and research assistant Joli Brown — studied what happens within the ecosystem of intertidal waters, using the New York-New Jersey Harbor Estuary as a site for intervention.

    17 November 2022
    Intertidal Objects
  • In a perspective article published today in Nature Machine Intelligence, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Drs. Ge Wang, Pingkun Yan, and Chuang Niu presented “Medical Technology and AI (MeTAI)” in the metaverse that promises to develop new intelligent health care. This represents a multidisciplinary collaboration among academic and clinical researchers with University of Chicago, Johns Hopkins University, Stony Brook University, industrial leaders from GE Healthcare and Canon Medical Research, and regulatory experts at the FDA and Puente Solutions.

  • The Rensselaer Game Showcase (RGS) — a celebration of creativity and innovation in student-designed video games — will be held in the McNeil Room of the Rensselaer Student Union on Saturday, November 19, from noon to 5 p.m. The event is free and open to the campus and local community.

  • Propofol is the most commonly used drug to induce general anesthesia. Despite its frequent clinical application, it is poorly understood how propofol causes anesthesia.

  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will launch the Douglas A. Mercer ’77 Innovation and Exploration Laboratory at 10:30 a.m. on November 9 at the Russell Sage Dining Hall. Affectionately called the Mercer XLab, the facility aims to facilitate innovation in pedagogy and multiply learning opportunities by fostering interconnection among students and faculty. Mercer, a longtime supporter of his alma mater, originally made possible the Mercer Student Exploration Laboratory. Now, thanks to a $2 million gift, the laboratory is expanding in scope.

  • Students in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Bachelor of Arts in Architecture program contributed to the winning proposal in the recent Radical Innovation Awards competition, which challenges creative thinkers and designers at the professional and student level to pioneer compelling innovations in travel, hospitality, and architecture. The winning design, Aera, is a conceptual resort proposal from OBMI, a leading hospitality design firm and a consortium member in Rensselaer’s Institute for Energy, the Built Environment, and Smart Systems (EBESS), based in New York City.
  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Professor of Computer Science, Cognitive Science, and Industrial and Systems Engineering Deborah McGuinness was diagnosed with breast cancer nearly 10 years ago. Her treatments were emotionally and physically challenging: McGuinness endured six months of chemotherapy, 33 radiation treatments, and four surgeries before emerging with current “no evidence of disease” status. Throughout, McGuinness struggled to find appropriate information on her diagnosis and treatment.

    “It was hard to find information on my diagnosis that a lay person could understand,” said McGuinness. “There was also a lack of evidence-based, personalized advice.”