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WE BELIEVE IN THINKING BIG

The Rensselaer Technology Licensing Office focuses on promoting Rensselaer’s innovations to both benefit the public and stimulate economic growth. We are your dedicated resource for streamlining collaboration with industry. Click below to find information on securing intellectual property protection and how our office works with researchers to help protect and promote their discoveries and inventions.

Targeting Prostate Tumors with Better Precision

As clinicians work tirelessly to improve cancer treatment on a more personalized level, they are partnering closely with engineers who are enabling vastly improved medical imaging. “In order to do precision medicine, you need to see better,” said Pingkun Yan, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer. “If you cannot see, you can’t do anything.”

ONE SPARK IGNITES A DOZEN MORE

Our mission at Rensselaer’s Technology Licensing Office is to share great ideas with you. We encourage you to browse our database of available technologies. These inventions may help shape the future of your business.

Marcian “Ted” Hoff Class of 1958

In 1969, Hoff invented the first electronic circuit that combined complicated computer functions on a single silicon chip, earning him recognition as the “father of the microprocessor.” This single chip had as much computing power as the first electronic computer, ENIAC, which in 1946 filled a room. The microprocessor created a revolution in computing.

Latest News

  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) will hold its 24th annual Black Families Technology Awareness Day on Saturday, February 4. The event, free and open to the public, is designed to introduce historically underrepresented students in grades K-12, their families, and educators to educational and career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

  • Are there other Earth-like planets? Is there extraterrestrial life? In the quest to find planets that orbit stars other than the sun, “Earth 2.0” is the Holy Grail. Earth 2.0 is a planet similar enough to Earth to enable the existence of life as we know it. It would be the right temperature for liquid water, and it would orbit a star with a steady supply of light. Ideally, it would be close enough that we could imagine going there or at least sending a probe to explore it.

  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Fudong Han, Priti and Mukesh Chatter ’82 Career Development Chair in Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, has been awarded the National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award for Electronic Transport in Sulfide-Based Lithium Solid Electrolytes. The NSF CAREEER award is presented to junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through research and education, and the integration of these endeavors in the context of their organizations’ missions.

  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will present a performance by two-time Grammy-winning ensemble Third Coast Percussion on Saturday, January 28, at 7:30 p.m. in the Concert Hall of the Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) on campus.

  • The Center for Research toward Advancing Financial Technologies (CRAFT), a collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Stevens Institute of Technology, is dedicated to advancing blockchain technology so that scams along the lines of FTX’s can be avoided. CRAFT researchers from Rensselaer recently presented their findings on blockchain interoperability and cryptocurrency scam detection at the 2022 IEEE International Conference on Big Data.

  • High school students from 14 schools will gather on the campus of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute on Saturday, January 7, for the season kickoff of the 2023 FIRST ® Robotics Competition. At the event, teams will learn the details of this year’s challenge — Charged UpSM, presented by Haas.

  • The Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute unveils their Spring 2023 season of interdisciplinary performances that bridge the gap between artistic practices, and between art and technology. Starting in January through May, artists in residence at EMPAC premiere shows that span dance, visual arts, performance-installations, multimedia concerts, new music, film, and hybrid theatrical productions.

  • Two officers of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Board of Trustees have completed their terms. Arthur Golden ’66, board chair, and Wanda Denson-Low ’78, vice-chair, have made great contributions to Rensselaer. They helped to execute The Rensselaer Plan and The Rensselaer Plan 2024, the university’s strategic roadmaps; they were instrumental in guiding Rensselaer through the COVID-19 pandemic; and their generosity has helped to transform the Institute. Golden will now become Chairman Emeritus and Denson-Low will become Trustee Emerita.

  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) was awarded $740,000 for research and education from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The project is led by Professor Jie Lian, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering at RPI, and Prof. Shanbin Shi's co-PI project from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech).

  • In an article published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Dr. Deepak Vashishth and Joan Llabre, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, presented evidence of a link between Alzheimer’s, osteoporosis, and diabetes. While recent evidence showed loss of bone mineral density with Alzheimer’s disease, this is the first study to demonstrate the effects of the Alzheimer’s disease phenotype on bone quality and link changes in bone and amyloid formation in the brain.

    Currently there is no way to measure amyloid load in brain.  Modifications in bone can predict amyloids in the brain. Additionally, the protein modifications in bone are caused by sugar and are commonly seen in diabetes and aging.  This finding therefore provides a potential mechanism of links between diabetes and Alzheimer’s.